Libycus & Ibygrep

What is Libycus?

Libycus is an Open Source C++ programming library for accessing files in the format created by the Thesaurus Linguae Graecae and Packard Humanities Institute. It is not a program or application in itself, but is intended to be used as a component of a program or application for searching the TLG and PHI CD-ROMS. Developers who wish to use or contribute to Libycus can visit Libycus page at SourceForge

Is there any software that uses Libycus?

So far, there is one program: Ibygrep, a TLG/PHI command-line search tool for Windows.

Can I use Libycus for my software

Yes. As long as you abide by the terms of the GNU General Public License. Just visit the Libycus page at SourceForge, and download the source code or get it from the CVS repository. (Please don’t email me to ask how use CVS, there are plenty of online resources for this). Contact me if you want to contribute to the development of Libycus itself. Let me know if you have used Libycus in a project of your own.

Why is it called “Libycus”?

Libycus is named in honor of the Ibycus computer which provided many classicists their first view of the texts on the TLG and PHI CD-ROMS. The Ibycus played a brief but important role in Classics:

Originally, the only easy way to access, search, and excerpt material from the TLG disk was by means of the specially designed Ibycus computer. The Ibycus had grown up almost as a sibling to the electronic TLG. David Packard, a member of one of the founding families of the Hewlett-Packard computer company, is a classicist with a strong faculty for computer applications. He created the Ibycus computer as a machine dedicated specifically to working with classical languages, complete with a Greek/Roman alphabet wordprocessor and a text-search tool for the TLG built in. Because of the limited market for such a machine and the rapidly declining prices of other personal computers and multilingual wordprocessors, attention has shifted away from the Ibycus to more standardized computer tools. Classical Outlook 71.1 (1993): 21-24

The prefix lib- is commonly used to designate programming libraries

What is Ibygrep?

Ibygrep is an Open Source Windows command line search tool for PHI and TLG CD-ROMS. It has only been tested under Windows 95 and 2000, but should also run under Windows 98 and NT. The current Version is 1.0

Ibygrep performs simple searches of all or selected texts. In the following example all authors with “Plato” in their names are searched for the string “atlanti”:

C:\ibygrep>ibygrep -d D: -a Plato -t ATLANTI
4 authors:
TLG1128 Anonymi Commentarius In Platonis Theaetetum
TLG4227 Anonymus De Philosophia Platonica Phil.
TLG0497 Plato Comic.
TLG0059 Plato Phil.

&1Plato& Phil.
-----------------------
Tim.24.e.4: QEI=SAN E)K TOU= *)ATLANTIKOU= PELA/GOUS. TO/TE GA\R POREU/SIMON
Tim.25.a.5: O)RQO/TAT' A)\N LE/GOITO H)/PEIROS. E)N DE\ DH\ TH=| *)ATLANTI/DI NH/SW|
Tim.25.d.2: MA/XIMON PA=N A(QRO/ON E)/DU KATA\ GH=S, H(/ TE *)ATLANTI\S NH=SOS
Criti.108.e.6: TW=N D' OI( TH=S *)ATLANTI/DOS NH/SOU BASILH=S, H(\N DH\ *LIBU/HS
Criti.113.c.2: SKEUA/ZONTES, OU(/TW DH\ KAI\ TH\N NH=SON *POSEIDW=N TH\N *)ATLANTI/DA
Criti.113.e.7: MOUS GENNHSA/MENOS E)QRE/YATO, KAI\ TH\N NH=SON TH\N *)ATLANTI/DA
Criti.114.a.7: *)ATLANTIKO\N LEXQE/N, O(/TI TOU)/NOM' H)=N TW=| PRW/TW| BASILEU/SANTI @1
Criti.120.d.3: TW=| *)ATLANTIKW=| GE/NEI. QANA/TOU DE\ TO\N BASILE/A TW=N SUG-

TLG1615 Platonius Gramm.
TLG5035 Scholia In Platonem

&1Scholia In Platonem&
-----------------------
R.327a,bis.8: O)/NTAS AU)TH=S, NIKW=NTAS TO\N PRO\S *)ATLANTI/NOUS PO/LEMON: A(\ DH\ TOI=S
R.519c,bis.3: MAKA/RWN NH/SOUS E(\C TO\N A)RIQMO\N E)N TH=| E)NTO\S *LIBU/H| KATA\ TO\ *)AT[2L]2AN-
Ti.24e,bis.1: $1*)ATLANTIKOU= PELA/GOUS.$
Ti.24e,quat.8: TH=S *)ATLANTI/DOS, O)/NTWS GENOME/NHS NH/SOU E)KEI= PAMMEGEQESTA/THS, H(\N
Ti.24e,quat.9: E)PI\ POLLA\S PERIO/DOUS DUNASTEU=SAI PASW=N TW=N E)N TW=| *)ATLANTIKW=|

Search time: 10 seconds.

Ibygrep was written as a demonstration program for Libycus, but it is also a quick, simple to use search tool. Download it here.

Ibygrep FAQ

Can I buy Ibygrep?
No. It is free. You also cannot sell Ibygrep.

Is there a version with a nice, graphical user interface? Is there a version for any platform other than Windows
No, but anyone can use Libycus to write their own programs, for any platform. I wrote Libycus to encourage the creation of new, better search tools for TLG, PHI and related files.

Why is it called “Ibygrep”?
It is a combination of “Ibycus” (see below) and grep, a Unix text-file search tool.

5 thoughts on “Libycus & Ibygrep

  1. Very useful, this powerful tool is only one of that kind. Many thanks to author, I was able to create a simple TLG/PHI reader into my software. But seems be little obsolete now, database structure of TLG was slightly changed. Is possible to made an update? Or, is there any documentation concerning database structure of TLG? I cannot find it.

    Good work, thanks.

    • Milan,

      Glad you’ve found Libycus useful. I wrote the library using disk D I think, and know they’ve come out with disk E at least since then. I’m not sure what differences there might be. I’d love to update it but I haven’t had access to a TLG disk for a while.

  2. I was try rebuild libycus again, with modified code for actual gnu compiler ie. switches, inline functions etc, but still is the same – some works are shown with shorter lenght of text, function eow() fails somehow. for examle corpus hermeticum, poimandres. but mostly it works fine, excellent work anyway. examine my code if you like

    svn co https://marcion.svn.sourceforge.net/svnroot/marcion marcion

    in Marcion you can see it directly, through main menu ‘library->open TLG/PHI’

    best regards, Milan Konvicka

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